Why choose a Company Retreat Facilitator?

Why choose a Company Retreat Facilitator?
Posted by on October 23, 2017

Run your Retreat in the Right Way with an experienced  Company Retreat Facilitator!

 

So we have written about how to recognise it is the right time and factors to think about when deciding the right place, now we must understand the right way for your company retreat or off site. This  predominantly comes down to choosing the best company retreat facilitator to help you ensure you meet your company retreat objectives.  Right time, place and way make up 3 corners of the square for effective communication. The last corner the ‘right agenda’ for your company retreat we will cover next week!

 

1)        What is the purpose of your experience?

What does success look like?   What area of do you really want to develop most over the time you are all together? Be specific about your purpose. Your purpose should be more focused than “strategic planning,” for example. Identify specific actions or ideas that you want to have come out of the retreat.

Keep your purpose realistic. You might have large goals that cannot be accomplished within one retreat. Prioritise your needs and desires. If you know you will not have the time to accomplish everything, choose 1 or 2 priorities for this retreat, and end the day with a plan for addressing the other issues. Talk to the people you will invite on this retreat, and see if they have any ideas about the goals you should set for the retreat. When people are consulted ahead of time, they will be more invested in the retreat and its outcomes. A Corporate Retreat Facilitator should play a very useful role in this pre retreat planning to help you keep the objectives clear and realistic!

 

2)        Work with Travel Out There to find the right trainer / facilitator

It is difficult for a participant to serve as the company retreat facilitator. Participants, if correctly selected to attend the retreat, do have a stake in the outcome of the discussions. For this reason, expecting the CEO or a manager of the company, to facilitate the retreat is often a poor choice. This interest makes it very challenging for them to also serve as a neutral group facilitator. Travel Out There have the experience and network of competence to provide the company retreat facilitator or trainer(s) that are most qualified to support the purpose of your experience.

All of the facilitators we work with are experts in group dynamics, group processes, team building, decision-making and consensus building. During the retreat the facilitator manages the group discussion and ensures that fear, lack of trust, or complacency does not creep in to the room, hence promoting an atmosphere where everyone is wanting to actively participate.

We like to think that our meeting facilitators act like referees on a sports field or conductors in a orchestra. They explain the rules, keep the structure / format goal orientated, schedule accordingly and help ensure that everyone has a chance to shine. Our sole interest is in helping you have a successful retreat.

Why choose a Travel Out There Facilitator in the first place?

It is difficult for a retreat participant to serve as the facilitator.  Participants, if correctly selected to attend the retreat, do have a stake in the outcome of the discussions.  For this reason, expecting the CEO or a manager of the company, to facilitate the retreat is often a poor choice. This interest makes it very challenging for them to also serve as a neutral group facilitator.

 

3)        Manage the alcohol.

It is important to ensure that expectations are set from the start that this is a work/play experience. You are keen to get people connecting, communicating and collaborating and returning to the office inspired and invigorated not hung-over and feeling drained from a 3-day piss up. Alcohol consumption can be managed by closely reviewing open bar options and / or providing drinks packages at restaurants, dinner venues and hotels. This ensures your event does not spiral out of control both on a quantative and qualatative perspective.

austin (139 Posts)